EP word of the week (#78): Passagem de Ano

Hello, everyone!

This will be the last EP word of the week post of the year, so it makes sense to talk a bit about the celebrations related to New Year’s Eve in Portugal.

Here, New Year’s Eve is known either literally as [a] véspera do Ano Novo or as [a] Passagem de Ano. The latter means “the year’s passage (in the sense of moving from one year to the other), and it’s probably the most common term to describe the date and the events surrounding it together with the French borrowing [o] Réveillon.

In any case, it’s customary for people to gather with family or friends to celebrate the coming of the year. At midnight, twelve bell rings announce the new year and people traditionally eat 12 raisins – [as] passas – (one for each month, for luck and prosperity). The largest cities also have world-renowned fireworks displays – [o] fogo de artifício in Portuguese -:

People toast with champagne ([o] champanhe) and commonly start the year by banging pots and pans together or with wooden spoons/anything that will make a loud noise on metal! It’s weird, I know, but it’s a once a year event, so people do go out of their way to make it as memorable as possible.

I wish you all a happy New Year! Feliz Ano Novo!

 

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2 thoughts on “EP word of the week (#78): Passagem de Ano

  1. julkastarter December 29, 2016 / 5:23 am

    Luís, feliz Ano Novo para você! Obrigada pelos todos materiais no seu blog. Espero para as novas publicações!

    Like

    • luisdomingos December 29, 2016 / 1:09 pm

      Obrigado, Yuliya :D Feliz Ano Novo :)

      Like

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